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10 Reasons For Rejection of Work Permit Applications in Canada


Work Permit Rejection

Applying for a work permit in Canada can be a complex and time-consuming process. A successful application requires attention to detail, adherence to guidelines, and a thorough understanding of the requirements. A rejected work permit application can lead to significant disruptions in your plans and may even jeopardize your chances of future applications.


Reasons for Rejection of Work Permit applications

Reason 1: Incomplete or inaccurate application

One of the primary reasons for work permit application rejection is an incomplete or inaccurate application. For example, John submitted his application with the wrong date format for his employment history, which led to confusion about his eligibility. It is essential to provide accurate information and ensure that all sections of the application form are filled out correctly.


Examples of work permit applications refused:


Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on incomplete or inaccurate information:

  1. In the case of Suryanarayanan v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2014 FC 488, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he failed to provide the required documentation, including a valid job offer from a Canadian employer. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had failed to establish that he met the requirements for a work permit.

  2. In the case of Tran v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2016 FC 136, the applicant's work permit application was refused because she failed to disclose that she had previously worked in Canada without authorization. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's failure to disclose this information constituted misrepresentation.

  3. In the case of Ibrahim v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2016 FC 1199, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he failed to provide sufficient evidence that he met the requirements for a work permit, including proof of his qualifications and language proficiency. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the onus of establishing that he met the requirements for a work permit.

Reason 2: Insufficient supporting documents

A work permit application requires various supporting documents, such as proof of identity, job offer, educational credentials, and more. In the case of Sarah, her application was rejected because she failed to provide a certified translation of her diploma. Always submit complete and clear documentation to support your application and avoid delays or rejections.

Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on insufficient supporting documents:

  1. In the case of Gu v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2018 FC 971, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not provide sufficient documentation to demonstrate that he had completed his studies and was eligible for a post-graduate work permit. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit due to his insufficient supporting documents.

  2. In the case of Bakhtiar v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2017 FC 1226, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not provide sufficient documentation to demonstrate that he had the necessary qualifications and experience for the job he had been offered in Canada. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit due to his insufficient supporting documents.

  3. In the case of Rao v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2015 FC 42, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not provide sufficient documentation to demonstrate that he had the necessary qualifications and experience for the job he had been offered in Canada. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit due to his insufficient supporting documents.

Reason 3: Invalid or ineligible job offer

A valid job offer is a crucial component of a work permit application. In the case of Michael, his application was rejected because his employer did not obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) for his position, which is required for most work permit categories. Ensure that your job offer meets the necessary requirements and is supported by a positive LMIA or proof of LMIA exemption, if applicable.


Here are a few case law examples of work permit application being refused based on invalid or ineligible job offer:


  1. In the case of Duff v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1992] 1 F.C. 602, the applicant's work permit application was refused because the job offer did not meet the requirements for a work permit, specifically that it did not meet the minimum wage standards set by the government. The court upheld the decision, stating that the job offer was not a valid offer of employment.

  2. In the case of Miah v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1996] F.C.J. No. 554, the applicant's work permit application was refused because the job offer did not meet the requirements for a work permit, specifically that it did not meet the requirements for a valid job offer, including that the job must be full-time, permanent and in a skilled occupation. The court upheld the decision, stating that the job offer did not meet the criteria for a valid job offer.

  3. In the case of Lo v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1997] F.C.J. No. 1101, the applicant's work permit application was refused because the job offer did not meet the requirements for a work permit, specifically that it did not meet the minimum language requirements for the occupation. The court upheld the decision, stating that the job offer did not meet the requirements for a valid job offer.

Reason 4: Inadequate proof of financial support

Applicants must demonstrate that they have sufficient financial resources to support themselves and any accompanying family members while in Canada. In Susan's case, her work permit application was denied because she failed to provide sufficient proof of funds, such as bank statements and salary slips. Be prepared to submit clear evidence of your financial stability to avoid rejection.


Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on inadequate proof of financial support:

  1. In the case of Piggott v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1993] F.C.J. No. 1334, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not provide sufficient proof of financial support for himself and his dependents. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

  2. In the case of Abbas v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2018 FC 1077, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not provide adequate proof of his financial resources to support himself during his stay in Canada. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not provided sufficient evidence to establish that he had adequate funds to support himself.

  3. In the case of Li v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), [2002] F.C.J. No. 468, the applicant's work permit application was refused because she did not provide sufficient proof of financial support, specifically that the funds in her bank account were not hers and were not available for her use. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

Reason 5: Medical inadmissibility

All work permit applicants must undergo a medical examination to ensure they do not pose a risk to public health or safety. In the case of Ahmed, his application was rejected due to a medical condition that could place excessive demand on Canada's healthcare system. Be aware of the medical requirements for work permit applications and address any health-related concerns before submitting your application.


Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on medical inadmissibility:

  1. In the case of Sukhram v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1993] F.C.J. No. 1176, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was found to be medically inadmissible due to a communicable disease. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's medical condition made him inadmissible to Canada.

  2. In the case of Muluye v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), 2015 FC 291, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was found to be medically inadmissible due to a mental health condition. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's medical condition made him inadmissible to Canada.

  3. In the case of Pistorius v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), [1993] F.C.J. No. 1080, the applicant's work permit application was refused because she was found to be medically inadmissible due to a physical disability. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's medical condition made her inadmissible to Canada.

Reason 6: Criminal inadmissibility

Work permit applicants must also pass a background check and security screening. In the case of Maria, her application was rejected because of a prior criminal conviction in her home country. To overcome criminal inadmissibility, you may need to apply for rehabilitation or a temporary resident permit, depending on your circumstances.

Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on criminal inadmissibility:

  1. In the case of Bawari v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2017 FC 1284, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was found to be criminally inadmissible due to a prior conviction for assault. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's criminal history made him inadmissible to Canada.

  2. In the case of Pacheco v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), [2000] F.C.J. No. 1611, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was found to be criminally inadmissible due to a prior conviction for drug trafficking. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's criminal history made him inadmissible to Canada.

  3. In the case of Dhanjal v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), 2005 FC 990, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was found to be criminally inadmissible due to a prior conviction for assault causing bodily harm. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant's criminal history made him inadmissible to Canada.

Reason 7: Non-compliance with previous immigration conditions

If you have a history of non-compliance with immigration conditions in Canada, your work permit application may be rejected. For example, Tom's application was denied because he had previously overstayed his visitor visa. It is crucial to maintain your legal status in Canada and follow all immigration rules to avoid jeopardizing future applications.


Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on non-compliance with previous immigration conditions:

  1. In the case of Gu v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2018 FC 971, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he had failed to comply with the conditions of his previous study permit, including attending the school he was authorized to attend. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit due to his non-compliance with previous immigration conditions.

  2. In the case of Xu v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2017 FC 406, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he had failed to comply with the conditions of his previous work permit, including working for the employer he was authorized to work for. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit due to his non-compliance with previous immigration conditions.

  3. In the case of Zan v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2014 FC 282, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he had failed to comply with the conditions of his previous work permit, including working for the employer he was authorized to work for and maintaining his status in Canada. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit due to his non-compliance with previous immigration conditions.

Reason 8: Misrepresentation or fraud

Providing false or misleading information on your work permit application can lead to rejection and severe consequences, such as being found inadmissible to Canada. In the case of Linda, her application was denied because she submitted a fake employment reference letter. Always provide truthful and accurate information in your application to avoid misrepresentation or fraud.

Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on misrepresentation or fraud:

  1. In the case of Alvi v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1993] F.C.J. No. 562, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he had misrepresented his work experience and qualifications. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had engaged in misrepresentation, which made him inadmissible to Canada.

  2. In the case of Ihsan v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), [2007] F.C.J. No. 769, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he had submitted fraudulent documentation, including a fake job offer and fake bank statements. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had engaged in fraud, which made him inadmissible to Canada.

  3. In the case of Sanara v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2015 FC 892, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he had failed to disclose that he had previously worked in Canada without authorization. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had engaged in misrepresentation by failing to disclose this information.

Reason 9: Inability to demonstrate intent to leave Canada

Work permit applicants must prove their intention to leave Canada once their permit expires . In the case of Rahul, his application was rejected because he failed to establish strong ties to his home country and did not provide evidence of plans to return home after his work permit expired. To avoid this issue, ensure you demonstrate your intent to leave Canada by providing documentation that shows your connections to your home country, such as property ownership, family ties, and a stable job or business.


Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on inability to demonstrate intent to leave Canada:

  1. In the case of Wang v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), [2005] F.C.J. No. 1512, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was unable to demonstrate that he had sufficient ties to his home country to establish an intention to leave Canada at the end of his authorized stay. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

  2. In the case of Singh v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), [2006] F.C.J. No. 346, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he was unable to demonstrate that he had strong ties to his home country and that he would leave Canada at the end of his authorized stay. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

  3. In the case of Kaur v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2019 FC 1234, the applicant's work permit application was refused because she was unable to demonstrate that she had sufficient ties to her home country to establish an intention to leave Canada at the end of her authorized stay. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

Reason 10: Insufficient language proficiency

Language proficiency is an essential requirement for certain work permit categories. In the case of Anna, her application was rejected because she did not meet the minimum language requirements for her job position. To avoid this issue, ensure that you meet the necessary language requirements for your work permit category and provide valid language test results from an approved testing agency.


Here are a few case law examples of refusal of work permit applications based on insufficient language proficiency:

  1. In the case of Yuzon v. Canada (Minister of Employment and Immigration), [1993] F.C.J. No. 1463, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not meet the minimum language requirements for the occupation, which was a requirement for the work permit. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

  2. In the case of Zhang v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration), 2016 FC 53, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not meet the minimum language requirements for the occupation and had not provided evidence of language training or improvement. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

  3. In the case of Singh v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), 2017 FC 1041, the applicant's work permit application was refused because he did not meet the minimum language requirements for the occupation and had not provided evidence of language training or improvement. The court upheld the decision, stating that the applicant had not met the requirements for a work permit.

Understanding the reasons for work permit rejections can help you avoid common pitfalls and improve your chances of a successful application. By paying close attention to the application form, providing complete and accurate supporting documents, meeting the eligibility requirements, and addressing any potential issues before submitting your application, you can increase your chances of obtaining a work permit in Canada and pursuing your career goals. Remember, each case is unique, and it is crucial to stay informed about the specific requirements and conditions for your work permit category.


Has your work permit application been rejected or refused? Let Immergity Immigration Consultant guide you through the work permit application process, ensuring a smooth and successful experience. Our team of dedicated professionals is here to help you navigate the complex immigration system and find the best pathway tailored to your unique situation.

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